Cognitive functioning

AlzForum (June 24, 2016): Online Course Gives Guidance on How to Lower Dementia Risk

Posted by on Jul 12, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

AlzForum (June 24, 2016): Online Course Gives Guidance on How to Lower Dementia Risk Publication Date:  Fri, 06/24/2016 Starting in July, a massive open online course (MOOC) will translate recent population-based findings into practical advice on how individual people might lower their risk of dementia. Called “Preventing Dementia,” the course will summarize facSee Original Article AlzForum (July 9, 2016): German Families with Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Disease Meet for the First Time Publication Date:  Sat, 07/09/2016 Nobody knew each other’s name. Even so, 60 people who either were at risk of having an autosomal-dominant Alzheimer’s mutation, or were accompanying someone who was, exchanged information about a shared problem. There were moments of validation – See Original Article New York Times (July 8, 2016): For Effective Brain Fitness, Do More Than Play Simple Games Publication Date:  Fri, 07/08/2016 WHEN a “brain fitness” course was introduced at her retirement community, Connie Cole was eager to sign up. After joining, she learned how to use an Apple iPad and work more complex tasks verbally and on paper. See Original Article Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Forum (April 20, 2016): Drug Trials Challenges for Alzheimer’s and Other Urgent Needs Publication Date:  Wed, 04/20/2016 This Forum explored the challenges and complexities of drug trials, and how they impact disease treatment and prevention –  particularly for conditions that currently have little or no therapeutic options. As a case study, the panel discussed AlzheimSee Original...

Read More

Boston Globe (June 16, 2016): Suzanne Corkin, 79; Research Expanded the Understanding of Memory

Posted by on Jun 18, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Boston Globe (June 16, 2016): Suzanne Corkin, 79; Research Expanded the Understanding of Memory Publication Date:  Thu, 06/16/2016 Suzanne Corkin and Henry Molaison shared more than just a research relationship, though that collaboration put them in the history books. When experimental surgery left him unable to form long-term memories, he became arguably the world’s most stSee Original Article Tangled Bank Studios (April 21, 2016): A Journalist's Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and Drug Development Publication Date:  Thu, 04/21/2016 Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. It is a biological disease marked by physical changes in the brain—most notably buildup of small protein clumps called plaques and tangles – that lead to the death of nerve cells. The cell death usuSee Original Article Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Forum (April 20, 2016): Drug Trials Challenges for Alzheimer’s and Other Urgent Needs Publication Date:  Wed, 04/20/2016 This Forum explored the challenges and complexities of drug trials, and how they impact disease treatment and prevention –  particularly for conditions that currently have little or no therapeutic options. As a case study, the panel discussed AlzheimSee Original Article Boston Herald (May 22, 2016): Hope vs. Alzheimer's: Researcher, Husband, Part of Pioneering Study Publication Date:  Sun, 05/22/2016 Dorene Rentz, one of 
the local neuropsychologists behind a pioneering Alzheimer’s study, spends her days searching for 
answers in the mysterious plaques that invade the brains of those suffering from the incurable disease. And Rentz’s seaSee Original...

Read More

Canada.com (May 26, 2016): Could Alzheimer’s Stem from Infections? ‘Provocative’ Harvard Study May Hold Key to Disease

Posted by on Jun 14, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Canada.com (May 26, 2016): Could Alzheimer’s Stem from Infections? ‘Provocative’ Harvard Study May Hold Key to Disease Publication Date:  Thu, 05/26/2016 Could it be that Alzheimer’s disease stems from the toxic remnants of the brain’s attempt to fight off infection? Provocative new research by a team of investigators at Harvard leads to this startling hypothesis, which could explain the origins See Original Article Boston.com (April 30, 2016): A ‘Rock Star’ Harvard Professor Just Launched a New App for Alzheimer’s Patients Publication Date:  Sat, 04/30/2016 Last week, Rudolph Tanzi was laying down keyboard tracks at Johnny Depp’s L.A. music studio for Joe Perry’s soon-to-be-released solo album. This past week, he launched a new app for Alzheimer’s patients. Tanzi, of course, knows what an importSee Original Article Nature Index (May 4, 2016): 170 Years After It Made Medical History, this US Hospital is Still at the Cutting Edge Publication Date:  Wed, 05/04/2016 MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL IS THE MOST PROLIFIC HEALTHCARE ORGANISATION PUBLISHING IN TOP JOURNALS See Original Article National Institutes of Health (May 3, 2016): Seizures Disrupt Memory Network Publication Date:  Tue, 05/03/2016 Epilepsies are a spectrum of brain disorders in which surges of electrical activity in clusters of brain cells cause seizures. At least 2.3 million adults and nearly 500,000 children in the U.S. live with some form of epilepsy. Partial, or focal, sSee Original...

Read More

National Institute on Aging (April 6, 2016): Data Sharing: The Name of the Game in Alzheimer’s Research

Posted by on Apr 28, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

National Institute on Aging (April 6, 2016): Data Sharing: The Name of the Game in Alzheimer’s Research Publication Date:  Wed, 04/06/2016 Thousands of gene candidates in the human genome have the potential to play a role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. But you are just one scientist. How can you even start such an enormous task? This quest – one scientist analySee Original Article Washington Post (February 26, 2016): Keeping Mentally Active Doesn’t Stave Off Alzheimer’s Disease — Only Its Symptoms Publication Date:  Fri, 02/26/2016 The prevailing wisdom about dementia is simple: Keep your mind active as you age to lower the risk of cognitive decline. But is the same true for Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form of dementia? New research suggests that the answeSee Original Article Harvard Medical School (March 3, 2016): Crossing a Barrier Publication Date:  Thu, 03/03/2016 The blood-brain barrier at the interface between the brain’s blood vessels and nerve cells acts as a vital gatekeeper to the brain, allowing essential nutrients and fluids to pass into the central nervous system and the web of our brain’s neuroSee Original Article Science Magazine (March 31, 2016): Alzheimer’s May be Caused by Haywire Immune System Eating Brain Connections Publication Date:  Thu, 03/31/2016 More than 99% of clinical trials for Alzheimer’s drugs have failed, leading many to wonder whether pharmaceutical companies have gone after the wrong targets. Now, research in mice points to a potential new target: a developmental process gone awSee Original...

Read More

Hebrew SeniorLife Blog (February 24, 2016): Shining a Light on Mental Health and Older Adults

Posted by on Mar 28, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Hebrew SeniorLife Blog (February 24, 2016): Shining a Light on Mental Health and Older Adults Publication Date:  Wed, 02/24/2016 What is good health? I think it’s safe to say that the answer to that question is not the same for everyone. To some it may mean the absence of disease. For others it may be effectively managing a chronic condition. But for many of us, good healtSee Original Article Alzheimer's News Today (March 16, 2016): NIH Launches Program to Investigate Link Between Alzheimer’s and Vascular Disease Publication Date:  Wed, 03/16/2016 The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have launched the Molecular Mechanisms of the Vascular Etiology of Alzheimer’s DiseSee Original Article Washington Post (February 26, 2016): Keeping Mentally Active Doesn’t Stave Off Alzheimer’s Disease — Only Its Symptoms Publication Date:  Fri, 02/26/2016 The prevailing wisdom about dementia is simple: Keep your mind active as you age to lower the risk of cognitive decline. But is the same true for Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form of dementia? New research suggests that the answeSee Original...

Read More

MIT News (March 17, 2016): “Lost” Memories Can Be Found

Posted by on Mar 21, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

MIT News (March 17, 2016): “Lost” Memories Can Be Found Publication Date:  Thu, 03/17/2016 In the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, patients are often unable to remember recent experiences. However, a new study from MIT suggests that those memories are still stored in the brain — they just can’t be easily accessed. The MIT neuroSee Original Article Harvard Health Publications (March 9, 2016): Decline in Dementia Rate Offers “Cautious Hope” Publication Date:  Wed, 03/09/2016 “The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will grow each year as the size and proportion of the U.S. population age 65 and older continue to increase. The number will escalate rapidly in coming years as the baby boomSee Original Article National Institutes of Health (February 23, 2016): “Invisible Work” Toll among Family and Unpaid Caregivers Publication Date:  Tue, 02/23/2016 Family and other unpaid caregivers perform many activities on a regular basis as they help an older adult. These include making appointments, ordering and keeping track of medicines, assisting with personal care, shopping, doing housework, and provSee Original Article Hebrew SeniorLife Blog (February 24, 2016): Shining a Light on Mental Health and Older Adults Publication Date:  Wed, 02/24/2016 What is good health? I think it’s safe to say that the answer to that question is not the same for everyone. To some it may mean the absence of disease. For others it may be effectively managing a chronic condition. But for many of us, good healtSee Original...

Read More