Cognitive functioning

Boston Globe (March 10, 2017): Don’t Write Us Off: People with Dementia Press for More Rights — and Respect

Posted by on Apr 2, 2017 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Boston Globe (March 10, 2017): Don’t Write Us Off: People with Dementia Press for More Rights — and Respect Publication Date:  Fri, 03/10/2017 Ten months ago, Peter Mittler stood before a global audience of Alzheimer’s disease researchers and advocates and decried the indignities that people with dementia undergo. He knows the subject intimately: Mittler, an 86-year-old British psychologSee Original Article New York Times (March 1, 2017): Frequent, Brisk Walks May Aid Those With Early Alzheimer’s Publication Date:  Wed, 03/01/2017 For some people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, frequent, brisk walks may help to bolster physical abilities and slow memory loss, according to one of the first studies of physical activity as an experimental treatment for dementia. But tSee Original Article The Guardian (February 21, 2017): Long-Winded Speech Could Be Early Sign of Alzheimer's Disease, Says Study Publication Date:  Tue, 02/21/2017 Rambling and long-winded anecdotes could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to research that suggests subtle changes in speech style occur years before the more serious mental decline takes hold. The scientists behind the work said iSee Original Article Journal of the American Association (February 15, 2017): Alzheimer Outlook Far From Bleak Publication Date:  Sat, 02/18/2017 Last summer, deep disappointment befell the Alzheimer disease (AD) community when study results showed that the widely heralded experimental drug LMTX had failed to help AD patients. In November, another promising drug, solanezumab, also dashed hopes.See Original...

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Science Magazine (January 27, 2017): The Polluted Brain

Posted by on Feb 24, 2017 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Science Magazine (January 27, 2017): The Polluted Brain Publication Date:  Fri, 01/27/2017 In a barbed wire – enclosed parking lot 100 meters downwind of the Route 110 freeway, an aluminum hose sticks out of a white trailer, its nozzle aimed at an overpass. Every minute, the hose sucks up hundreds of liters of See Original Article Harvard Medical School News (January 18, 2017): An App a Day Publication Date:  Wed, 01/18/2017 A pilot study led by Ipsit Vahia, a member of the HMS faculty of psychiatry and medical director of Geriatric Psychiatry Outpatient Services at McLean Hospital, suggests that the use of tablet computers is both a safe and potentially effective apprSee Original Article Boston Globe (January 9, 2017): Mass. Police Increase Dementia Training Publication Date:  Mon, 01/09/2017 Faye Miles, a vibrant woman who loved gardening, said she was going to run a quick errand, hopped in her truck, and headed toward the farmstand five minutes from her Wareham home. Then, the 68-year-old retired teacher vanished. Hours later, in the midSee Original Article MGH Research News (January 25, 2017): Superagers Retain Youthful Memory and Brain Publication Date:  Wed, 01/25/2017 A gradual decline in memory is a dreaded effect of normal aging. But Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have discovered that some people in their 60s, 70s or 80s have the youthful memories of 20-year-olds and their brains show why. Bradford DiSee Original...

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Fox News Latino (September 28, 2016): U.S. Latinos Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease Expected to Grow More Than 800%

Posted by on Dec 30, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Fox News Latino (September 28, 2016): U.S. Latinos Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease Expected to Grow More Than 800% Publication Date:  Wed, 09/28/2016 A recent report doesn’t bode well for the population of aging Latinos in the United States. According to “Latinos and Alzheimer’s Disease: New Numbers Behind the Crisis,” which was released last week, as many as 3.5 million Latinos are expecteSee Original Article Harvard Gazette (September 13, 2016): Clues to How ‘Super-Agers’ Retain Young Memories Publication Date:  Tue, 09/13/2016 Some loss of memory is usually considered an inevitable part of aging, but new research reveals how some people appear to escape that fate. A study by investigators at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital examined a group of older adulSee Original Article National Institutes of Health (September 8, 2016): NIH Award Expands Landmark Alzheimer’s Biomarker Study Publication Date:  Thu, 09/08/2016 The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) – the long-running National Institutes of Health-supported study investigating brain and fluid biomarkers of the disease – enters a new phase of discovery with the launch of ADNI3. With the receSee Original Article 2016 Alzheimer's Association (MA/NH Chapter) Annual Report: A Commitment to Accelerating Research Publication Date:  Thu, 12/01/2016 In an old factory building with breathtaking views of Boston Harbor and the Charlestown Navy Yard, a group ofmore than 20 researchers spend their Thursday afternoon looking at brain scans and discussing their findings of the week.  This doesn’t looSee Original...

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New York Times (July 20, 2016): Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions

Posted by on Sep 27, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

New York Times (July 20, 2016): Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 New Regions Publication Date:  Wed, 07/20/2016 The brain looks like a featureless expanse of folds and bulges, but it’s actually carved up into invisible territories. Each is specialized: Some groups of neurons become active when we recognize faces, others when we read, others when we raise See Original Article Future Travel Experience (August 18, 2016): Heathrow Airport Launches Programme to Offer Dementia-Friendly Experience Publication Date:  Thu, 08/18/2016 Heathrow Airport is now working with the Alzheimer’s Society so it can learn about dementia and offer the best experience for travellers with the illness. The programme is called ‘Dementia Friendly Communities’ and is part of the Prime MinisSee Original...

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National Institutes of Health (August 9, 2016): An Expanded Map of the Human Brain

Posted by on Sep 25, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

National Institutes of Health (August 9, 2016): An Expanded Map of the Human Brain Publication Date:  Tue, 08/09/2016 Our thinking, perception, and ability to understand language are processed in the outermost layer of the brain, the cerebral cortex. Knowing exactly where our senses and perceptions take shape in the brain is important for unraveling how aging, neuSee Original Article Harvard Gazette (September 13, 2016): Clues to How ‘Super-Agers’ Retain Young Memories Publication Date:  Tue, 09/13/2016 Some loss of memory is usually considered an inevitable part of aging, but new research reveals how some people appear to escape that fate. A study by investigators at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital examined a group of older adulSee Original Article Scientific American (July 27, 2016): Alzheimer’s Patients Face Flurry of Fees While Waiting for Specialized Care Publication Date:  Wed, 07/27/2016 Lengthy waiting lists for rooms for Alzheimer’s patients are forcing caregivers to put their loved ones in less specialized facilities – which often levy additional fees for every extra service required to keep those vulnerable residents safSee Original Article National Institutes of Health (September 8, 2016): NIH Award Expands Landmark Alzheimer’s Biomarker Study Publication Date:  Thu, 09/08/2016 The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) – the long-running National Institutes of Health-supported study investigating brain and fluid biomarkers of the disease – enters a new phase of discovery with the launch of ADNI3. With the receSee Original...

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Los Angeles Times (July 13, 2016): Brain Changes Wrought by Gene Linked to Alzheimer’s May Begin in Childhood, Scientists Say

Posted by on Jul 19, 2016 in Cognitive functioning | 0 comments

Los Angeles Times (July 13, 2016): Brain Changes Wrought by Gene Linked to Alzheimer’s May Begin in Childhood, Scientists Say Publication Date:  Wed, 07/13/2016 The gene that makes some people more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease as adults also affects the brain development and mental abilities of children, a new study shows. Researchers who examined brain scans of 1,187 kids and teens found distinct pSee Original Article Canada.com (May 26, 2016): Could Alzheimer’s Stem from Infections? ‘Provocative’ Harvard Study May Hold Key to Disease Publication Date:  Thu, 05/26/2016 Could it be that Alzheimer’s disease stems from the toxic remnants of the brain’s attempt to fight off infection? Provocative new research by a team of investigators at Harvard leads to this startling hypothesis, which could explain the origins See Original Article Alzheimer's Association (July 6, 2016): House Hears the Call of Alzheimer’s Association Advocates, Proposes Critical Research Funding Increase Publication Date:  Wed, 07/06/2016 Today, the House Labor-HHS Appropriations Subcommittee proposed a $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research at the NIH. This bipartisan effort was led by Alzheimer’s champion Chairman Tom Cole (R-Okla.) and comes just weeks after the SenatSee Original Article Boston Globe (July 14, 2016): New Research Consortium to Focus on Alzheimer’s Publication Date:  Thu, 07/14/2016 Five drug makers, including Cambridge-based Biogen Inc., are banding together with academic scientists to form a research consortium aimed at speeding development of therapies for Alzheimer’s, a neurological disorder that has stubbornly eluded trSee Original...

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